Educational opportunity

1/26/2014

Vendors at Farm and Ranch Show make most of chance to inform the public.

Vendors at Farm and Ranch Show make most of chance to inform the public.

By KELTON BROOKS

kbrooks@gctelegram.com

From Advanced Power Distributor to Wylie Sprayers, vendors positioned themselves throughout the showcase of the 2014 Garden City Farm and Ranch Show Saturday at the Finney County Exhibition Building.

A few spectators filled the lengthy rows of chairs as they were tuned in to the voice of Nashville's own Rusty Rierson flowing through the speakers. Ford, Dodge and Chevrolet model trucks had their hoods lifted, showcasing their gleaming engines on the outer edges of the indoor facility surrounding the host of vendors, and large tractors to hand trenchers were all on the display.

Stationed in a row furthest from the entrance was the Sea Minerals All Natural Fertilizer booth.

"We're trying to get people to change gears to an all-natural fertilizer that we extract from the ocean," said James Dohle, who was one of the attendants at the booth, his first time at the winter showing.

"I was excited about the show to give more information on the experiments that have been done with this (fertilizer), and it's a fascinating project," he said.

Sea Minerals works as a plant fertility supplement that re-mineralizes the plant. It comes from clean sea water and contains 90 or more minerals and trace minerals in the same proportions that those same minerals occur in the blood of healthy animals.

As Dohle continued to man the booth along with Dr. Lynn Buhr, they said they will be back next year.

With the towering heavy machinery and other farm equipment, it wouldn't be a true Garden City show without a display from the John Deere Tech Program from Garden City Community College.

"It started off a bit slow, but then it began to pick up," said Elaine Serafin, public relations officer at GCCC, who said this was her first time at the Farm and Ranch Show, which opened Thursday and ran through Saturday.

Serafin said the booth was there to promote the John Deere course itself, and to explain how it benefits students who pursue the path.

"The program is well sought out and only accepts about 24 students from all over," Serafin said.

The John Deere program is designed to advance the technical skills and professionalism of new John Deere service technicians, preparing them to excel in today's high tech, fast-paced field of agricultural mechanization.

As the crowd number began to dwindle, one booth attendant gave suggestions as to how to keep the show buzzing, while at the same time providing information about his station.

"We make compost turners for feedlots out here, directional bore machines, and over 160 pieces of equipment," said Dustin Stansbury, sales representative of Vermeer Great Plains. "We have everything from agriculture, utility construction and everyday lawn and garden equipment."

As for the show itself, Stansbury felt a few adjustments are needed going forward.

"As long as they continue to do this annually, it will get better," Stansbury said.

"Having Rusty up there singing was a good idea, but I think we need more vendors, announcers speaking about different products, or giving vendors the chance to speak about their products on stage," he said. "The numbers might not have been what was expected, but it will continue to grow."

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